COVID-19 Support

Colorado Workers ー Know Your Rights
With Respect to COVID-19 / Coronavirus

Last updated June 8, 2020

(Jump to Workplace Safety, Unemployment Insurance, Working from Home, Paid or Unpaid Time Off, Disability, Discrimination, Housing or Evictions, Vulnerable Populations)

Haga clic aquí para ver esta información abajo en español.


Workers throughout Colorado and across the country are facing new and pressing challenges in light of the COVID-19 or “Coronavirus” pandemic. This guide is designed to answer Colorado workers’ questions about their rights and available resources. We will do our best to update this guide as laws and resources change.

If you have an employment related concern that is not addressed by this guide, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.


Workplace Safety

1. Can I be fired for raising workplace safety concerns with my employer? 

Under the Public Health Emergency Whistleblower Law (“PHEW”), an employer cannot retaliate against you for raising reasonable concerns about a workplace’s threats to your health or safety. 

If you have been let go from work or are facing retaliation for having raised workplace safety concerns please contact us about your situation via our online intake forms in either English or Spanish.

2. Does the Public Health Emergency Whistleblower Law (“PHEW”) protect independent contractors?

Yes. If you are an independent contractor and you have been terminated from a job for speaking up about workplace safety conditions you are owed substantial penalties for these violations. 

If you have been the victim of retaliation by an employer for speaking up about your workplace safety, we encourage you to fill out our online intake form in either English or Spanish.       

3. Do the protections of the Public Health Emergency Whistleblower Law (“PHEW”) apply to me if I am undocumented?

Yes. Regardless of a worker’s immigration status, they are covered by the protections under PHEW. Under the PHEW, an undocumented worker is entitled to the same protections as any worker who has work authorization to work in the U.S legally or is a U.S citizen.

4. I’m afraid of getting COVID-19. Can I work from home?

Generally, you do not have the right to work from home unless it is allowed by your employer. Working from home, however, may sometimes be a reasonable accommodation for a qualified disability under the ADA. If you believe you may qualify for an accommodation under the ADA, you should discuss an accommodation with your employer.

If your employer denies your request or you have a related concern, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

5. Do the protections of the Public Health Emergency Whistleblower Law (“PHEW”) apply to me if I am undocumented?

Yes. Regardless of a worker’s immigration status, they are covered by the protections under PHEW. Under the PHEW, an undocumented worker is entitled to the same protections as any worker who has work authorization to work in the U.S legally or is a U.S citizen.

6. What happens if I get sick? Can I get fired ? 

If you are or may be sick, we urge you not to go to work. As detailed below, there are laws that protect workers from getting fired due to serious health conditions. If you become sick because of work, you may be eligible for workers compensation.

If you get sick at work and/or are fired because you are sick, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

7. What do I do if my employer makes me work under unsafe conditions that I fear will cause me to contract COVID-19? 

If your employer is forcing you to work under unsafe conditions, you should report the problem to the employer and file a complaint with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), a complaint form is available here. Your employer can’t retaliate against you for reporting unsafe conditions to them or to a federal or state agency. Importantly, however, complaining about the problem may not resolve the problem promptly. If your workplace is unsafe, you also of course have the right to stop working. You may be able to argue later that you had “just cause” to quit, which would mean you’d be eligible for unemployment insurance. You may also later be able to argue that you were subject to an unlawful termination and that you are entitled to damages. But we can’t make any guarantees that you’ll be successful in making either of those arguments.

8. Can my employer prohibit me from discussing health and safety concerns at work with management or my coworkers?

Generally, no. Your employer cannot prohibit you from talking about health and safety concerns at work. In fact, the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) protects the rights of you and your coworkers to work together to demand better policies from your employer, such as employer-provided personal protection equipment in order to safely perform your job. There are also retaliation protections for reporting workplace health and safety violations to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

If your employer is prohibiting you from discussing health and safety concerns at work or retaliating against you for reporting violations, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

9. What if my employer remains open but seems like it’s nonessential and should therefore be closed under state or local order? 

If your employer remains opened, but seems like it should be closed, you should report the business to your local public health agency. A list of local public health agencies is available here. If you don’t receive a prompt response from that office, you should also submit a report to the Colorado Attorney General’s Office by sending an email to: covid19@coag.gov. You can also fill out our intake form, available here, and we can make an anonymous report for you, but we urge you to contact public officials directly.

10. What can a worker do if her employer is not giving her the equipment needed to protect herself?

Employers are obligated to provide their workers with personal protective equipment (PPE) needed to keep them safe while performing their jobs. If your employer is not providing masks and hand sanitizer, please contact us. If you cannot work six feet apart (social distancing) or are not provided the ability to hand wash, please contact us. If you feel there are other safety issues at work, please contact us at info@towardsjustice.org

11. Can an employer send a worker home if she displays symptoms associated with COVID-19?

Yes. The CDC recommends that workers who become ill with symptoms of influenza-like illness at work during a pandemic should leave the workplace. It does not violate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for an employer to send such an employee home during a pandemic.

12. Can an employer take a worker’s temperature?

For the duration of the pandemic, yes. Normally, employers are prohibited from engaging in medical examinations of employees (such as taking an employee’s temperature) unless the employer can establish that the examination was job-related and consistent with business necessity. But new guidance says that employers can take certain preventive steps after a pandemic is declared, including sending sick workers home. This guidance clarifies that because the World Health Organization declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020, and the CDC and state and local health authorities have acknowledged community spread of COVID-19 and issued attendant precautions, employers may currently measure employees’ body temperature. As with all medical information, the fact that an employee had a fever or other symptoms would be subject to ADA confidentiality requirements.

13. Are workers who contracted COVID at work eligible for worker’s comp?

If you believe you contracted COVID at work, you may be eligible for worker’s compensation. For a free and confidential legal consultation of your individual situation please feel free to fill out our legal intake form here. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

14. What can I do if I believe my employer is breaking the law or taking advantage of government relief programs?

A number of federal laws protect workers from retaliation for reporting their employers for committing fraud against the government. If you believe your employer is breaking the law and would like to know more about your rights, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.


Unemployment

15. What can I do if I have lost my job or had my hours cut due to COVID-19?

Colorado workers should apply for Unemployment Insurance here. The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) is waiving many of the eligibility requirements, and we continue to advocate for further extension of these benefits. You should apply even if you’re not sure if you qualify. The CARES Act (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) was passed on March 26, 2020 and enhances and expands Unemployment Insurance to workers through an emergency assistance program called Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA).

There are many ways you may qualify for PUA:

• You have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and are seeking a medical diagnosis.

• You had to quit your job(s) because you have been diagnosed by a medical professional as having COVID-19 and have been instructed to quarantine or you have been instructed to quarantine because you have come in direct contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

• You had to quit your job(s) because you have tested positive for COVID-19 and, after the infection passes, you developed health complications that make it impossible for you to perform your old job(s).

• You refuse to return to work due to: (1) unsatisfactory or hazardous working conditions based on your status as a member of a vulnerable group, or (2) unsatisfactory or hazardous working conditions because you reside with a person who is a member of a vulnerable group.

• You are providing care for a family member or a member of your household who has been diagnosed with COVID-19.

• You have primary caregiving responsibility for a child or other person in your home who is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency and that caregiving prevents you from working.

• You are unable to reach your place of employment because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.

• You are unable to reach your place of employment because you have been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19.

• You were scheduled to start a job but now cannot start that job due to the coronavirus.

• You have become the breadwinner or major support for a household because the head of the household has died as a direct result of COVID-19.

• You had to quit your job as a direct result of COVID-19. For example, if you were diagnosed with COVID-19 by a qualified medical professional, and after the infection passes, it caused health complications that make it impossible for you to perform your old job.

• Your place of employment is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency.

• You are classified as an independent contractor or are self-employed and are unemployed, partially employed, or unable or unavailable to work because the COVID-19 public health emergency has severely limited your ability to do the work you usually do.

• Additional information: https://www.nelp.org/campaign/covid-19-unemployed-and-frontline-workers/

• File for PUA in Colorado here: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdle/ui/new-claimant

If you apply for Unemployment Insurance and are rejected, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

16. Can I apply for unemployment insurance if my employer says I am an independent contractor?

Yes. You should apply for unemployment insurance even if your employer says you are an independent contractor. To start, many workers who are told they are independent contractors are actually employees so you should apply for unemployment insurance so that the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) can determine whether or not you are an employee entitled to unemployment insurance. In addition, if you are properly categorized as an independent contractor, you may be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) if you are authorized to work in the US. To apply for PUA in Colorado, click here.

If you apply for unemployment insurance and are rejected, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

17. What can I do if I work for myself?

First, even if you think you work for yourself, you may actually be an employee, and you should still apply for unemployment insurance. https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdle/unemployment

Additionally, even people who are not eligible for unemployment insurance will be eligible for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program if they are authorized to work in the US, which pursuant to the new federal law allows up to 39 weeks of benefit payments to freelancers and self-employed people who are not eligible for Unemployment Insurance. You should contact the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment with questions about that program here.

You may also be eligible for loan assistance under the CARE Act. For more information about loans you may qualify for under the CARE Act, visit the U.S. Small Business Administration website here.

18. Can I apply for unemployment insurance if I am an immigrant with work authorization (such as a VISA) or a DACA recipient?

Colorado law requires anyone 18 years or older to provide proof that he/she is lawfully present in the United States before receiving unemployment benefits. A worker with a visa demonstrating authorization to work both during employment and after losing the job should be eligible for unemployment insurance. We recommend you apply for unemployment insurance if you have a currently valid work visa and could take a new job if/when you find one.

If you apply for Unemployment Insurance and are rejected, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

19. Can I apply for unemployment insurance if I am undocumented?

No. Undocumented workers are not eligible to apply for unemployment in Colorado though you may be eligible for other cash benefits.

20. If I am an undocumented and my employer tells me not to report to work, what can I do?

Being placed on unpaid leave is significantly better than being temporarily laid off for undocumented workers because when an employee takes unpaid leave, the employee continues their employment with their employer and does not need to re-verify their employment authorization. In addition, employers may maintain an employee’s group health benefits while the employee is on leave.

In addition, many immigrant workers are ineligible for programs, such as unemployment insurance, that serve as a safety net for other workers after layoffs. Finally, while an employee is on leave, she retains her employment—and when the leave ends, she will be continuing her employment rather than being re-hired by her employer. As a continuing employee, her employer does not need to re-verify her employment authorization.


Working from Home

21. If I am working from home, is my employer required to pay me for my time? What if working from home has been expensive? 

Yes. Your employer is required to pay you even if you are working from home. In addition, if you have incurred additional expenses because your employer required you to work from home, you may have wage and hour claims. You can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

**Additional Questions Regarding Working From Home visit Workplace Safety**


Leave: Paid or Unpaid Time Off

22. What protections do I have under the new Healthy Families and Workplaces Act “(“HFWA”) ?

The Healthy Families and Workplaces Act (“HFWA”) extends upto 2 weeks of paid sick leave if you:

  • have COVID-19 symptoms and are seeking a medical diagnosis; 
  • are instructed by a government agencyn or a health provider to quarantine or isolate due to COVID-19 risk
  • are taking care of someone else due to COVID-19 precautions — either someone ordered to quarantine or isolate, or a child whose school, place of care, or childcare is closed or unavailable.  

All employers in Colorado, regardless of size, must provide HFWA paid sick leave through the end of 2020

23. If I am undocumented, am I protected by the Healthy Families and Workplaces Act (“HFWA”)? 

Yes. Regardless of immigration status, you are entitled to the 2 weeks of paid sick leave from work at your regular pay rate, or the locally applicable minimum wage, whichever is higher. If you are taking the leave because you need to take care of someone else, you can be paid for the two weeks at ⅔ your regular pay rate

If you get sick are fired because you have asked for paid sick leave, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.


24. I think I might have COVID-19. Can I take paid time off?

The Colorado Health Emergency Leave with Pay (“Colorado HELP”) Rules temporarily require employers in certain industries to provide up to 14 days of two-thirds sick paid leave to employees who have tested positive for COVID-19, have COVID-like symptoms, or have been directed to quarantine or isolation due to COVID-19 concerns. These rules took effect March 11, 2020 and were broadened March 26, April 3, and April 27 in response to concerns raised by worker advocates, including Towards Justice. Covered industries include: leisure and hospitality; food services; child care; education; food and beverage manufacturing, and related work with educational establishments; home health, if working with elderly, disabled, ill, or otherwise high-risk individuals; nursing homes; community living facilities; retail establishments, real estate and leasing, offices and office work, elective health services, and various personal care services.

The two weeks are “calendar” days and employees are paid only for days they would have worked. For example, if an employee falls ill on June 1, 2020 and makes plans to get tested or is told by a health care provider to quarantine, then the maximum amount of time covered by this rule is June 1-14, and the employee gets paid for the days they would have worked during this period.

The Federal Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act of March 18, 2020 created a right to paid leave for many employees, but doesn’t cover everyone. Most notably, it doesn’t cover the 48% of the American workforce that works for companies with over 500 employees. Qualified workers get two weeks of paid sick leave if they are ill, quarantined or seeking diagnosis or preventive care for coronavirus, or if they are caring for sick family members. Part time workers are entitled to paid sick leave earning what they typically earn in a two-week period, and self-employed workers can receive paid leave by claiming it as a tax credit. These rights expire December 31, 2020.

If you are being denied leave or believe you should be receiving paid leave, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

25. What documentation can my employer request?

Employers are not allowed to require documentation as a pre-condition to take paid leave under the Colorado Help Rules because the purpose of the rules is to encourage leave-taking by employees who otherwise could spread COVID-19. An employer may, however, request documentation from employees who are returning from leave that establish the employee obtained a prescription for a COVID-19 test or was tested for COVID-19. Employees may also provide documentation of the same information by providing a written statement, which need not be notarized or in any particular form, to their employer.

26. Can I take time off work to care for my children or other family members?

It depends. Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), employers must provide their employees with paid sick leave and paid family leave for reasons relating to COVID-19. Through the end of the 2020, employees of certain employers are entitled to take up to 10 days of paid sick leave and up to 12 weeks of emergency paid family leave for reasons related to the COVID-19 public health crisis. In addition, there are no immigration status–related restrictions on eligibility for paid sick leave or paid family and medical leave. The FFCRA emergency paid sick and paid leave provisions will be enforced by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division, which should not inquire into workers’ immigration status.

Additionally, an employee who is sick, or whose family members are sick, may be entitled to up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job protected leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) regardless of their immigration status. The FMLA only covers larger employers with 50 or more employees, and an employee must have worked at least one year, and a minimum of 1,250 hours within the previous year). Upon the end of her leave, a worker should be reinstated to her previous (or similar) position.

If you are being denied leave, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.


Other: Disability, Housing & Vulnerable Populations

27. Do I have any protections if I am especially vulnerable due to additional health conditions, such as a compromised immune system? Can my employer treat me differently on this basis?

Individuals with qualified disabilities may be entitled to work from home or receive other reasonable accommodations under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Certain health conditions, such as a compromised immune system, may qualify as a disability under the ADA. Complications related to COVID-19 (beyond typical cold or flu symptoms) may also qualify for accommodations. If you believe you may qualify for an accommodation under the ADA, you should discuss an accommodation with your employer.

If your employer denies your request or you have a related concern, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

28. What should I do if I am experiencing discrimination at work because of my race, ethnicity, or national origin?

Both federal and state law prohibit discrimination by employers and coworkers based on your race, ethnicity, or national origin. If you believe you are experiencing discrimination, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

29. What should I do if my housing is tied to my employment?

In most cases, just because your employer provides housing doesn’t mean you don’t have housing rights. If you are concerned about losing your employer-provided housing, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here. Given the heightened health and safety concerns, we will be prioritizing any cases where housing is at risk.

30. What if I am being evicted but it is unrelated to workplace-provided housing?

See A Colorado Tenant’s Guide to COVID-19, a factsheet with rent and eviction resources and information about how to communicate with your landlord. You can also reach out to  attorney Zach Neumann at 720-325-6558 or at covid.eviction.defense@gmail.com with further questions.


En Español

Trabajadores de Colorado ー Conozcan Sus Derechos
Con Respecto a COVID-19 / Coronavirus

Actualizado: el 2 de julio de 2020

Trabajadores en todo Colorado y en todo el país están enfrentando nuevos retos relacionados al COVID-19 o Coronavirus. Esta guía fue diseñada para contestar las preguntas de los trabajadores de Colorado relacionadas a sus derechos y los recursos disponibles. Haremos todo lo posible para actualizar esta guía cuando cambian las leyes y/o los recursos. Si tiene alguna pregunta que esta guía no contesta, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.


Seguridad en el Lugar de Empleo

          1. Tengo miedo de contraer al COVID-19. ¿Puedo trabajar desde casa?

Generalmente, usted no tiene el derecho de trabajar desde casa a menos que sea permitido por su empleador. Trabajando desde casa, sin embargo, puede a veces ser una acomodación razonable para una discapacidad calificada bajo la ADA. Si usted cree que puede calificar para una acomodación bajo la ADA, usted debe hablar de una acomodación con su empleador.

Si su empleador rechaza su solicitud o si usted tiene una preocupación relacionada, usted puede contactarse con nosotros aquí para una evaluación de caso, gratis y confidencial.

2. ¿Qué pasa si me enfermo? ¿Puedo ser despedido?

Si usted está o si tal vez esté enfermo, nosotros le urgimos que no se vaya al trabajo. Cómo esta detallado abajo, hay leyes que protegen a trabajadores de ser despedidos debido a las condiciones serias de salud. Si usted se enferma por el trabajo, usted puede ser elegible por compensación de trabajador.

Si usted se enferma en el trabajo y/o es despedido porque usted está enfermo, usted se puede contactar con nosotros aquí para una evaluación de caso, gratis y confidencial.

3. ¿Qué hago si mi empleador me hace trabajar en condiciones inseguras que temo que me causarán contraer COVID-19?

Si su empleador le está obligando a trabajar en condiciones inseguras, usted debe reportar el problema al empleador y presentar una queja con la Administración de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional (OSHA), un formulario de queja está disponible aquí. Su empleador no le puede tomar una represalia contra usted por reportar las condiciones inseguras a ellos o a una agencia del estado o federal. De manera importante, sin embargo, haciendo una queja sobre el problema puede que no resuelva el problema prontamente. Si su lugar de trabajo está inseguro, usted también por supuesto tiene el derecho a dejar de trabajar. Usted tal vez pueda argumentar luego que tuviera una “causa justa” para renunciar, la cual significaría que usted sería elegible para seguro de desempleo. Usted además puede luego ser capaz de argumentar que usted fue sujeto de una terminación ilegal y que usted tiene derecho a los daños. Pero nosotros no podemos garantizar que usted tendrá éxito en hacer cualquier de aquellos argumentos.

4. ¿Puede mi empleador prohibirme de hablar de preocupaciones de seguridad y salud en el trabajo con la administración o mis compañeros de trabajo?

Generalmente, no. Su empleador no puede prohibirle de hablar sobre las preocupaciones de seguridad y salud en el trabajo. De hecho, la Ley Nacional de Relaciones Laborales (NLRA) protege a los derechos de usted y sus compañeros de trabajo para trabajar juntos para exigir las políticas mejores de su empleador, tales como el equipo de protección personal proveído por empleador para que se haga seguramente su trabajo. Hay además las protecciones de represalia por reportar las violaciones de seguridad y salud del lugar de trabajo a la Administración de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional (OSHA).

Si su empleador le está prohibiendo de hablar de las preocupaciones de seguridad y salud en el trabajo o le está tomando represalia contra usted por reportar a las violaciones, usted nos puede contactar aquí para una evaluación de caso, gratis y confidencial. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.

5. ¿Qué pasa si mi empleador permanece abierto pero parece que es no-esencial y debe entonces estar cerrado bajo la orden local o estatal?

Si su empleador permanece abierto, pero parece que debe estar cerrado, usted debe reportar el negocio a su agencia de salud pública local. Una lista de las agencias locales de salud pública está disponible aquí. Si usted no recibe una respuesta pronta de aquella oficina, usted debe además entregar una denuncia a la Oficina del Procurador General de Colorado por medio de enviarle un correo electrónico a: covid19@coag.gov. Usted además puede llenar nuestro formulario de ingreso, disponible aquí, y nosotros podemos hacer una denuncia anónima por parte de usted, pero le urgimos que se contacte directamente con los funcionarios públicos.

6. ¿Qué es lo que puede hacer una trabajadora si su empleador no le está dando el equipo necesario para protegerse?

Los empleadores son obligados proporcionar a sus trabajadores con el equipo de protección personal (PPE) necesario para mantenerse seguros mientras realizando sus trabajos. Si su empleador no está proveyendo tapabocas y alcohol en gel, favor de contactarse con nosotros. Si usted no puede mantener seis pies separados (el distanciamiento social) mientras trabajando o si no está proveído la capacidad de lavarse las manos, favor de contactarse con nosotros. Si usted siente que hay otros asuntos de seguridad en el trabajo, favor de contactarse con nosotros.

7. ¿Puede un empleador mandar un trabajador a casa si ella no tiene los síntomas asociados con COVID-19?

Sí. Los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC) recomiendan que los trabajadores quienes se enferman con los síntomas como la gripe en el trabajo durante la pandemia deben salir del lugar de trabajo. Esto no contraviene la Ley para Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA) para un empleador mandar tal empleado a casa durante una pandemia.

8. ¿Puede un empleador tomar la temperatura de un empleado?

Por la duración de la pandemia, sí. Normalmente, los empleadores están prohibidos de participar en las examinaciones médicas (tales como tomar la temperatura de un empleado) a menos que el empleador pueda establecer que la examinación fue relacionada al trabajo y consistente con la necesidad del negocio. Pero la nueva orientación dice que los empleadores pueden tomar ciertos pasos preventivos después de que una pandemia sea declarada, incluyendo mandando los trabajadores enfermos a casa. Esta orientación clarifica qué porque la Organización Mundial de la Salud declaró una pandemia el 11 de marzo de 2020, y los CDC y las autoridades locales y estatales han reconocido la propagación comunitaria de COVID-19 y han emitido las precauciones concomitantes, los empleadores deben actualmente medir la temperatura de los cuerpos de los empleados. Tal como toda la información médica, el hecho que un empleado tiene una fiebre u otros síntomas sería sujeto a los requisitos de la confidencialidad de la ADA.

9. ¿Son los trabajadores quienes han contraído COVID en el trabajo elegibles para la compensación de los trabajadores?

Si usted cree que contrajo COVID en el trabajo, usted puede ser elegible para la compensación de los trabajadores. Para una consulta legal gratis y confidencial de su situación individua favor de llenar nuestro formulario de ingreso aquí. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.

10.¿Qué puedo hacer si yo creo que mi empleador está rompiendo la ley o está tomando ventaja de los programas de ayuda del gobierno?

Una cantidad de las leyes federales protegen a los trabajadores de las represalias por reportar sus empleadores por cometer fraude contra el gobierno. Si usted cree que su empleador está rompiendo la ley y usted quería saber más sobre sus derechos, usted se puede contactar con nosotros aquí para una evaluación de caso, gratis y confidencial. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.


El Desempleo

11. ¿Qué puedo hacer si he perdido mi trabajo y he tenido mis horas cortadas debido a COVID-19?

Los trabajadores de Colorado deben aplicar por el Seguro de Desempleo aquí. El Departamento de Trabajo y Empleo de Colorado (CDLE) está renunciando muchos de los requisitos de elegibilidad, y nosotros continuamos abogando por una mayor extensión de estos beneficios. Usted debe aplicar incluso si no está seguro si usted califica. La ley federal del Cuidado (Ayuda de Coronavirus, Beneficios, y Seguridad Económica) se promulgó el 26 de marzo de 2020 y mejora y se expande el Seguro de Desempleo a los trabajadores tras un programa de auxilio de emergencia llamado Asistencia de Desempleo por Pandemia (PUA).
Hay varias maneras en que usted puede calificar por PUA:

• Usted fue diagnosticado con COVID-19 o está experimentando los síntomas de COVID-19 y está buscando un diagnóstico médico.

 Usted ha tenido que renunciar de su(s) trabajo(s) porque un profesional médico le diagnosticó que tenía COVID-19 y se le indicó que se pusiera en cuarentena o se le indicó que se pusiera en cuarentena porque ha estado en contacto directo con alguien que dio positivo por COVID-19.

• Usted ha tenido que renunciar de su(s) trabajo(s) porque ha dado positivo por COVID-19 y, después de que pasa la infección, desarrollaste complicaciones de salud que te imposibilitan realizar tu(s) trabajo(s) anterior(es).

• Usted niega volver a trabajar debido a: (1) condiciones laborales insatisfactorias o peligrosas basada en su estado de ser miembro de un grupo vulnerable, o (2) condiciones laborales insatisfactorias o peligrosas porque reside con una persona que es miembro de un grupo vulnerable.

• Usted tiene la responsabilidad de cuidar por un miembro de la familia o un miembro de su hogar que ha sido diagnosticado con COVID-19.

• Usted tiene la responsabilidad primaria de cuidar por un niño u otra persona en su casa quien no tiene la capacidad de asistir a la escuela u otra instalación que está cerrada como resultado directo de la emergencia de salud pública de COVID-19 y que cuidando le previene a usted de trabajar.

• Usted no puede alcanzar su lugar de trabajo por la cuarentena impuesta como resultado directo de la emergencia de salud pública de COVID-19.

• Usted no puede alcanzar su lugar de trabajo porque usted ha sido aconsejado por un proveedor de atención sanitaria de ponerse en cuarentena debido a las preocupaciones relacionadas a COVID-19.

• Usted fue programado para empezar un trabajo pero ahora no puede empezar este trabajo debido al coronavirus.

• Usted se hizo el sostén de la familia o el apoyo mayor para una casa porque el sostén de la casa ha muerto como resultado directo de COVID-19.

• Su lugar de empleo está cerrado como resultado directo de la emergencia de salud pública de COVID-19.

• Usted está clasificado como un contratista independiente o es autoempleado y no está empleado, empleado parcialmente, o no puede o no está disponible para trabajar porque la emergencia de salud pública de COVID-19 ha limitado severamente su capacidad de hacer el trabajo que usted normalmente hace.

• Más información aquí: https://www.nelp.org/campaign/covid-19-unemployed-and-frontline-workers/

https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/Return%20to%20Work%20Guidance%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

https://covid19.colorado.gov/sites/covid19/files/FAQs-CDLE-042720.pdf

Si usted aplica por el Seguro de Desempleo y está rechazado, usted puede contactarse con nosotros aquí para una evaluación, gratis y confidencial. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.

12. ¿Puedo aplicar por el seguro de desempleo si mi empleador dice que yo soy un contratista independiente?

Sí. Usted debe aplicar por el seguro de desempleo incluso si su empleador dice que usted es contratista independiente. Para empezar, muchos trabajadores quienes son contado que son contratistas independientes son realmente empleados entonces usted debe aplicar por el seguro del desempleo para que el Departamento de Trabajo y Empleo de Colorado (CDLE) puede determinar si o no usted es un empleado que tiene derecho al seguro de desempleo. Adicionalmente, si usted está categorizado correctamente como un contratista independiente, usted puede ser elegible por Asistencia de Desempleo por Pandemia (PUA), haga clic aquí.

Si usted aplica por el seguro de desempleo y está rechazado, usted puede contactarse con nosotros aquí para una evaluación gratis y confidencial. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.

13. ¿Qué puedo hacer si yo trabajo por mí mismo?

Primero, incluso si usted cree que trabaja por sí mismo, usted puede realmente ser un empleado, y usted debe todavía aplicar por el seguro del desempleo. Aquí: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdle/unemployment

Adicionalmente, incluso si la gente quien no es elegible por el seguro de desempleo será elegible para el programa de la Asistencia de Desempleo por Pandemia (PUA) si está autorizado trabajar en los EEUU, lo cual conforme a la nueva ley federal permite hasta 39 semanas de pagos de beneficio a los freelancers y la gente autoempleada quien no está elegibles por el Seguro de Desempleo. Usted debe contactarse con el Departamento de Trabajo y Empleo de Colorado con las preguntas sobre este programa. https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdle/covid-19/pua

Usted además puede ser elegible por asistencia de préstamo bajo la Ley federal de Cuidado (CARE Act). Para más información sobre los préstamos de que usted puede calificar bajo la Ley federal de Cuidado (CARE Act), visite al sitio de web de la Administración de Pequeñas Empresas de los EEUU aquí.

14. ¿Puedo aplicar por el seguro de desempleo si soy un inmigrante sin la autorización de trabajo (tal como VISA) o un recipiente de DACA?

La ley de Colorado requiere que cualquier persona que tiene 18 años o más para dar la comprobación que él/ella es legalmente presente en los Estados Unidos antes de recibir los beneficios de desempleo. Un trabajador con una visa demostrando la autorización para trabajar ambos durante el empleo y después de perder el trabajo debe ser elegible por el seguro de desempleo si usted tiene una visa actualmente válida y puede tomar un nuevo trabajo si/cuando pueda encontrar uno.

Si usted aplica por el seguro de desempleo y está rechazado, usted puede contactarse con nosotros aquí para una evaluación gratis y confidencial. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.

15. Si yo soy un indocumentado y mi empleador me dice no reportar al trabajo, ¿qué puedo hacer?

Ser puesto en licencia no remunerado es significativamente mejor que ser temporalmente despedido para los trabajadores indocumentados porque cuando un empleado toma la licencia no remunerado, el empleado continúa su empleo con su empleador y no tiene que verificar otra vez su autorización de empleo. Adicionalmente, los empleadores pueden mantener los beneficios de salud del grupo del empleado mientras el empleado está de licencia no remunerado.

Adicionalmente, muchos trabajadores inmigrantes están inelegibles para programas, tales como el seguro de desempleo, que sirve como una red de seguridad para otros trabajadores después de los despidos. Finalmente, mientras un empleado está de licencia no remunerado, ella retiene su empleo—siendo contratado de nuevo por su empleador. Como un empleado continúa, su empleador no tiene que verificar otra vez su autorización de empleo.


Trabajar desde Casa

16. Si yo estoy trabajando desde casa, ¿se requiere que mi empleador me paga por mi tiempo? ¿Qué pasa si trabajando desde casa ha sido caro?

Sí. Su empleador está obligado pagarle incluso si usted está trabajando desde casa. Adicionalmente, si usted ha incurrido gastos adicionales porque su empleador le ha requirió que usted trabajara desde casa, usted puede tener reclamos de salarios y de horas. Usted puede contactarse con nosotros aquí para una evaluación gratis y confidencial. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.


Licencias

17. Yo creo que tal vez tenga COVID-19. ¿Puedo tomar una licencia remunerada?

Las Reglas de Licencia de Emergencia con Sueldo de Colorado Health (“AYUDA de Colorado”) temporalmente requiere que los empleadores de ciertas industrias provean hasta 14 días a ⅔ de pago de licencia por enfermedad pagada a los empleados quienes dieron positivo para COVID-19, tienen los síntomas parecidos al COVID-19, o han sido ordenado a cuarentena o aislamiento debido a las preocupaciones de COVID-19. Estas reglas toman efecto el 11 de marzo de 2020 y fueron ampliadas el 26 de marzo, el 3 de abril, y el 27 de abril en respuesta a las inquietudes planteadas por los trabajadores defensores, incluyendo a Towards Justice. Las industrias cubiertas se incluyen: ocio y hospitalidad; servicios de comidas; cuidado de los niños; educación; fabricación de alimentos y bebidas; y los trabajos relacionados con los establecimientos de educación; salud en el hogar; si trabajando con los ancianos, los discapacitados, los enfermos, o de otra manera los individuos de alto-riesgo; hogares de ancianos; instalaciones de vivienda comunitaria; establecimientos minoristas; bienes raíces y arrendamiento, oficinas y trabajo de oficina, servicios de salud electiva y varios servicios de cuidado personal.

Las dos semanas son días “calendario” y a los empleados se les paga sólo por los días que habrían trabajado. Por ejemplo, si un empleado se enferma el 1 de junio de 2020 y hace planes para hacerse la prueba o un proveedor de atención médica le dice que se ponga en cuarentena, la cantidad máxima de tiempo cubierto por esta regla es del 1 al 14 de junio, y el empleado es pagado por los días que habrían trabajado durante este período.

La Ley Federal de Licencia por Enfermedad Pagada de Emergencia del 18 de marzo de 2020 creó un derecho a la licencia remunerada para muchos empleados, pero no cubre a todos. Más destacado, no cubre a los 48% de la fuerza de trabajo que trabaja para las compañías con más de 500 empleados. Los trabajadores calificados consiguen dos semanas de licencia por enfermedad pagada si están enfermos, en cuarentena o están buscando una diagnosis o el cuidado preventivo para el coronavirus, o si ellos están cuidando para miembros de la familia enfermos. Los trabajadores a tiempo parcial tienen derecho a la licencia por enfermedad pagada de que lo que típicamente ganan en un periodo de dos semanas, y los trabajadores autoempleados pueden recibir la licencia pagada por reclamarlo como un crédito fiscal. Estos derechos vencen el 31 de diciembre de 2020.

Si se le están negando la licencia o usted cree que debe estar recibiendo la licencia pagada, usted puede presentar una queja salarial ante la División de Normas y Estadísticas Laborales o contactarse con nosotros para una evaluación gratis y confidencial de caso. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.

18. ¿Qué documentación puede solicitar mi empleador?

Los empleadores no pueden exigir documentación como condición previa para tomar licencias pagadas bajo las Reglas de Ayuda de Colorado porque el propósito de las reglas es incentivar licencias de los empleados que de otro modo podrían propagar COVID-19. Sin embargo, un empleador puede solicitar documentación de los empleados que regresan de la licencia que establece que el empleado obtuvo una prueba COVID-19 o se le hizo la prueba COVID-19. Los empleados también puede proporcionar documentación de la misma información mediante una declaración escrita, que no necesita ser notariada o estar de ninguna forma particular, a su empleador.

19. ¿Me puedo tomar tiempo libre del trabajo por cuidar a mis niños o por otros miembros de la familia?

Depende. De conformidad con la Ley de Familias Primero de Respuesta al Coronavirus (FFCRA), los empleadores deben proporción a sus empleados licencia por enfermedad pagada y licencia familiar pagada por razones relacionadas con COVID-19. Hasta finales de 2020, los empleados de ciertos empleadores tienen derecho a tomar hasta 10 días de licencia por enfermedad remunerada y hasta 12 semanas de licencia familiar remunerada de emergencia por razones relacionadas con la crisis de salud publica de COVID-19. Además, no existen restricciones relacionadas con el estado migratorio sobre la elegibilidad para licencia por enfermedad remunerada o licencia familiar y médica remunerada. La División de Salarios y Horas del Departamento de Trabajo de los EE. UU. Aplicará las disposiciones de licencia pagada por enfermedad y baja pagada de emergencia de la FFCRA, que no deben investigar el estado migratorio de los trabajadores.

Además, un empleado que está enfermo, o cuyos familiares están enfermos, puede tener derecho a hasta 12 semanas de licencia laboral no remunerada y protegida de acuerdo con la Ley de Licencia Médica Familiar (FMLA), independientemente de su estado migratorio. La FMLA solo cubre a los empleadores más grandes con 50 o más empleados, y un empleado debe haber trabajado al menos un año y un mínimo de 1,250 horas en el año anterior). Al final de su licencia, un trabajador debe ser reincorporado a su puesto anterior (o similar).

Si se le están negando la licencia, usted puede contactarse con nosotros para una evaluación gratis y confidencial de caso. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.


Orientación Específico de Grupo

20. ¿Tengo algunas protecciones si yo soy especialmente vulnerable debido a condiciones de salud adicionales, como un sistema inmune comprometido? ¿Puede mi empleador tratarme de manera diferente sobre esta base?

Los individuos con discapacidades calificadas pueden tener derecho a trabajar desde casa o recibir otras adaptaciones razonables de conformidad con la Ley Federal de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA). Ciertas condiciones de salud, como un sistema inmune comprometido, pueden además calificar como una discapacidad según la ADA. Las complicaciones relacionadas con COVID-19 (más allá de los síntomas típicos de resfriado o gripe) también pueden calificar para acomodaciones. Si cree que puede calificar para una acomodación bajo la ADA, debe discutir una acomodación con su empleador.

Si su empleador se le niega su solicitud o si tiene una inquietud relacionada, usted puede contactarnos aquí para una evaluación gratis y confidencial de su caso. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí

21. ¿Qué debo hacer si estoy sufriendo discriminación en el trabajo debido a mi raza, origen étnico u origen nacional?

Ambas leyes federales y estatales prohíben la discriminación por parte de empleadores y compañeros de trabajo en función de su raza, origen étnico u origen nacional. Si cree que está experimentando discriminación, usted puede contactarnos aquí para una evaluación gratis y confidencial de su caso. Para llenar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí.

22. ¿Qué debo hacer si mi vivienda está vinculada a mi empleo?

En la mayoría de los casos, solo porque su empleador proporcione vivienda no significa que usted no tiene derechos de vivienda. Si le preocupa perder la vivienda proveída por su empleador, puede contactarnos aquí para una evaluación gratis y confidencial de su caso. Para completar este formulario en español, haga clic aquí. Dadas las mayores preocupaciones de salud y seguridad, daremos prioridad a cualquier caso en el que la vivienda esté en riesgo.

        23. ¿Qué sucede si me desalojan pero no está relacionado con la vivienda provista en el lugar de trabajo?

Consulte La Guida del Inquilino de Colorado para COVID-19, una hoja informativa con recursos de alquiler y desalojo e información sobre cómo comunicarse con su propietario. También puede comunicarse con el abogado Zach Neumann al 720-325-6558 o en covid.eviction.defense@gmail.com con más preguntas.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES