COVID-19 Support

Colorado Workers ー Know Your Rights

With Respect to COVID-19 / Coronavirus

Last updated March 27, 2020

Continua abajo para ver esta información en español.


Workers throughout Colorado and across the country are facing new and pressing challenges in light of the COVID-19 or “Coronavirus” pandemic. This guide is designed to answer Colorado workers’ questions about their rights and available resources. We will do our best to update this guide as laws and resources change. If you have an employment related concern that is not addressed by this guide, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

1. What can I do if I have lost my job or had my hours cut due to COVID-19?

Colorado workers should apply for Unemployment Insurance here. The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) is waiving many of the eligibility requirements, and we continue to advocate for further extension of these benefits. You should apply even if you’re not sure if you qualify. Additionally, the CARES Act (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) was passed on March 26, 2020 and enhances and expands Unemployment Insurance to workers.  More information on the CARES Act here.

If you apply for Unemployment Insurance and are rejected, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

2. Can I apply for Unemployment Insurance even if my employer says I am an independent contractor?

Yes. You should apply for Unemployment Insurance here even if your employer says you are an independent contractor. Many workers who are told they are independent contractors are actually employees. You should apply for Unemployment Insurance so that the CDLE can determine whether or not you are an employee entitled to Unemployment Insurance.

If you apply for Unemployment Insurance and are rejected, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

3. What can I do if I work for myself, but I can’t find work now because of the crisis? 

First, even if you think you work for yourself, you may be an employee under state unemployment insurance, and you should still apply (see Question 1 above). Additionally, even people who are not eligible for unemployment insurance will be eligible for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program, which pursuant to the new federal law allows up to 39 weeks of benefit payments to freelancers and self-employed people who are not eligible for Unemployment Insurance. You should contact the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment with questions about that program.

4. Can I apply for Unemployment Insurance if I am an immigrant with work authorization (such as a VISA) or a DACA recipient?

Colorado law requires anyone 18 years or older to provide proof that he/she is lawfully present in the United States before receiving unemployment benefits. A worker with a visa demonstrating authorization to work both during employment and after losing the job should be eligible for unemployment insurance. We recommend you apply for unemployment insurance if you have a currently valid work visa and could take a new job if/when you find one.

If you apply for Unemployment Insurance and are rejected, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

5. Can I apply for Unemployment Insurance if I am undocumented?

Undocumented workers are not eligible to apply for unemployment in Colorado though you may be eligible for other cash benefits.

6. I think I might have COVID-19. Can I take paid time off?

The Colorado Health Emergency Leave with Pay (“Colorado HELP”) Rules temporarily require employers in certain industries to provide up to 4 days of paid sick leave to employees with flu-like symptoms who are being tested for coronavirus COVID-19 or who are under instructions from a healthcare provider to quarantine or isolate due to a risk of having COVID-19. These rules took effect March 11, 2020 and were broadened on March 26 in response to concerns raised by worker advocates, including Towards Justice, and will be in force for 30 days, or longer if the state of emergency declared by the Governor continues.

Covered industries include: Leisure and hospitality; Food services; Child care; Education, including transportation, food service, and related work with educational establishments; Home health, if working with elderly, disabled, ill, or otherwise high-risk individuals; Nursing homes; Community living facilities; and retail establishments that sell groceries.

The Federal Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act of March 18, 2020 created a right to paid leave for many employees, but doesn’t cover everyone. Most notably, it doesn’t cover the 48% of the American workforce that works for companies with over 500 employees. Qualified workers get two weeks of paid sick leave if they are ill, quarantined or seeking diagnosis or preventive care for coronavirus, or if they are caring for sick family members. Part time workers are entitled to paid sick leave earning what they typically earn in a two-week period, and self-employed workers can receive paid leave by claiming it as a tax credit. These rights expire December 31, 2020.

If you are being denied leave or believe you should be receiving paid leave, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

7. Can I take time off work to care for my children or other family members?

The Federal Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act gives 12 weeks of paid leave to people caring for children whose schools are closed or whose child care provider is unavailable because of coronavirus. It also gives workers two weeks of sick leave to care for a sick family member. If you are caring for a sick family member, you may also qualify to take unpaid leave while continuing your health insurance under the federal Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

If you are being denied leave, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

8. Do I have any protections if I am especially vulnerable due to additional health conditions, such as a compromised immune system? Can my employer treat me differently on this basis?

Individuals with qualified disabilities may be entitled to work from home or receive other reasonable accommodations under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Certain health conditions, such as a compromised immune system, may qualify as a disability under the ADA. Complications related to COVID-19 (beyond typical cold or flu symptoms) may also qualify for accommodations.

If you believe you may qualify for an accommodation under the ADA, you should discuss an accommodation with your employer. If your employer denies your request or you have a related concern, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

9. I’m afraid of getting COVID-19. Can I work from home?

Generally, you do not have the right to work from home unless it is allowed by your employer. However, as explained above, working from home may sometimes be a reasonable accommodation for a qualified disability under the ADA.

If you believe you may qualify for an accommodation under the ADA, you should discuss an accommodation with your employer. If your employer denies your request or you have a related concern, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

10. What happens if I get sick? Can I get fired? What if I get sick at work?

Your health and the health of the community are our priorities at this time. If you are or may be sick, we urge you not to go to work. There are laws that protect workers from getting fired due to serious health conditions. If you become sick because of work, you may be eligible for workers compensation.

If you get sick at work and/or are fired because you are sick, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

11. If I am working from home, is my employer required to pay me for my time?

Yes. Your employer is required to pay you even if you are working from home. If they are not, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

12. Can my employer prohibit me from discussing health and safety concerns at work with management or my coworkers?

No, your employer cannot prohibit you from talking about health and safety concerns at work. In fact, the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) protects the rights of you and your coworkers to work together to demand better policies from your employer. There are also retaliation protections for reporting workplace health and safety violations to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

If your employer is prohibiting you from discussing health and safety concerns at work or retaliating against you for reporting violations, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

13. What should I do if I am experiencing discrimination at work because of my race, ethnicity, or national origin?

Both federal and state law prohibit discrimination by employers and coworkers based on your race, ethnicity, or national origin. If you believe you are experiencing discrimination, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

14. I’m working from home, and the set up has been expensive. What can I do?

If you have incurred additional expenses because your employer has required you to work from home, you may have wage and hour claims. You can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

15. What should I do if my housing is tied to my employment?

In most cases, just because your employer provides housing doesn’t mean you don’t have housing rights. If you are concerned about losing your employer-provided housing, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here. Given the heightened health and safety concerns, we will be prioritizing any cases where housing is at risk.

16. What can I do if I believe my employer is breaking the law or taking advantage of government relief programs?

A number of federal laws protect workers from retaliation for reporting their employers for committing fraud against the government.

If you believe your employer is breaking the law and would like to know more about your rights, you can contact us here for a free, confidential case evaluation. To fill out this form in Spanish, click here.

17. What if my business remains open but seems like it’s nonessential and should therefore be closed under Governor Polis’s order? 

If your employer remains opened, but seems like it should be closed, you should report the business to your local public health agency. A list of local public health agencies is available here. If you don’t receive a prompt response from that office, you should also submit a report to the Colorado Attorney General’s Office by sending an email to: covid19@coag.gov. You can also fill out our intake form, available here, and we can make an anonymous report for you, but we urge you to contact public officials directly.

18. What do I do if my employer makes me work under unsafe conditions that I fear will cause me to contract COVID-19? 

If your employer is forcing you to work under unsafe conditions, you should report the problem to the employer and file a complaint with the the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), a complaint form is available here. Your employer can’t retaliate against you for reporting unsafe conditions to them or to a federal or state agency. Importantly, however, complaining about the problem may not resolve the problem promptly. If your workplace is unsafe, you also of course have the right to stop working. You may be able to argue later that you had “just cause” to quit, which would mean you’d be eligible for unemployment insurance. You may also later be able to argue that you were subject to an unlawful termination and that you are entitled to damages. But we can’t make any guarantees that you’ll be successful in making either of those arguments.


En Español

Trabajadores de Colorado ー Conozcan Sus Derechos
Con Respecto a COVID-19 / Coronavirus
Actualizado: el 21 de marzo de 2020

Trabajadores en todo Colorado y en todo el país están enfrentando nuevos retos relacionados al COVID-19 o Coronavirus. Esta guía fue diseñada para contestar las preguntas de los trabajadores de Colorado relacionadas a sus derechos y los recursos disponibles. Haremos todo lo posible para actualizar esta guía cuando cambian las leyes y/o los recursos. Si tiene alguna pregunta que esta guía no contesta, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

  1. ¿Qué hago si pierdo mi trabajo o si me bajan las horas a causa de COVID-19?

Los trabajadores de Colorado deberían presentar un reclamo de seguro de desempleo AQUÍ. El propósito del seguro de desempleo es proporcionar asistencia financiera temporal a personas quienes se encuentran sin trabajo por causas ajenas a su propia cuenta. Usted debe ser capaz de trabajar y estar disponible para trabajar cada semana que esté recibiendo beneficios. El Departamento de Trabajo y Empleo de Colorado (“CDLE” por sus siglas en inglés) está dispensando de muchos de los requisitos de elegibilidad, y estamos abogando por beneficios más extensos. Debería presentar un reclamo aun si no está seguro que califica por estos beneficios. Además, la Ley “CARES” (Ayuda, por el Coronavirus, Alivio y Seguridad Económica) se aprobó el 26 de marzo de 2020 y mejora y amplía el seguro de desempleo a los trabajadores. Puede obtener más información sobre la Ley CARES aquí.

Si el CDLE rechaza su reclamo de seguro de desempleo, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

2. ¿Puedo presentar un reclamo de seguro de desempleo si mi empleador dice que soy un contratista independiente?

Si. Debería presentar un reclamo de seguro de desempleo (AQUÍ) aun si su empleador dice que eres un contratista independiente. Muchos trabajadores reciben información incorrecta con respecto a su estatus como contratista independiente, cuando en realidad son empleados bajo la ley. Usted debería presentar un reclamo de seguro de desempleo para que el CDLE pueda determinar si usted es un empleado con derecho al seguro de desempleo.

Si el CDLE rechaza su reclamo de seguro de desempleo, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

3. ¿Qué puedo hacer si trabajo para mí mismo, pero no puedo encontrar trabajo ahora debido a la crisis?

En primer lugar, incluso si cree que trabaja para usted mismo, puede ser un empleado cubierto por el seguro de desempleo estatal y aún debe presentar una solicitud (consulte la Pregunta 1 arriba para más información). Además, incluso las personas que no son elegibles para el seguro de desempleo serán elegibles para el programa de Asistencia de desempleo pandémico, que de conformidad con la nueva ley federal permite hasta 39 semanas de pago de beneficios a trabajadores independientes y autónomos que no son elegibles para UI. Debe comunicarse con el Departamento de Trabajo y Empleo de Colorado si tiene preguntas sobre ese programa.

4. ¿Puedo presentar un reclamo de seguro de desempleo si soy un inmigrante con una visa de trabajo o si tengo DACA?

La ley de Colorado requiere que todo trabajador que recibe beneficios de seguro de desempleo esté legalmente en el país. Un trabajador con una visa de trabajo que estuvo vigente durante toda la duración de su trabajo y que sigue actualizado puede presentar un reclamo de seguro de desempleo. Recomendamos que presente un reclamo si tiene una visa vigente y podría aceptar un nuevo trabajo si se lo ofreciera.

Si el CDLE rechaza su reclamo de seguro de desempleo, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

5. ¿Puedo aplicar al seguro de desempleo si soy indocumentado?

Los trabajadores indocumentados no son elegibles para solicitar seguro de desempleo en Colorado, aunque puede ser elegible para otros beneficios en efectivo.

6. Creo que tengo COVID-19. ¿Puedo tomar licencia por enfermedad?

Las Reglas de Emergencia de Salud y Licencia Remunerada de Colorado (“Colorado HELP” por sus siglas en inglés) requieren que empleadores en ciertas industrias ofrezcan hasta 4 días de licencia remunerada a los empleados que tienen síntomas de o quienes están haciendo un análisis por coronavirus COVID-19. Estas reglas se establecieron el 11 de marzo 2020 y seguirán vigentes por 30 dias o mas si sigue el estado de emergencia declarado por el Gobernador. Las industrias afectadas incluyen: Hospitalidad y actividades de ocio; la industria alimentaria; cuidado de niño; educación, incluyendo la transportación, servicio de comida, y todo trabajo relacionado a un establecimiento educativo; salud a domicilio, si se trabaja con los ancianos, discapacitados, enfermos, u otros individuos de alto riesgo; residencias de ancianos; residencias comunitarias.

El Acta Federal de Licencia Remunerada por Enfermedad del 18 de marzo 2020 creó un derecho a la licencia remunerada para empleados, pero no los cubre a todos. La exclusión más notable es que no cubre al 48% de los trabajadores del país que trabajan por compañías con más de 500 empleados. Los trabajadores calificados reciben dos semanas de licencia remunerada si están enfermos, en cuarentena, o buscando un análisis o cuidado preventivo para coronavirus, o si están cuidando a un miembro de su familia que está enfermo. Los trabajadores de tiempo parcial también tienen derecho a la licencia remunerada y ganan lo que típicamente ganan cada dos semanas. Los trabajadores autónomos pueden recibir la licencia remunerada si lo reclaman como un crédito de impuestos. Estos derechos tienen una fecha de expiración del 31 de diciembre de 2020.

Si a usted le niegan la licencia remunerada o si cree que debería recibir la licencia por enfermedad, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

7. ¿Puedo tomar licencia para cuidarles a mis hijos u otros miembros de mi familia?

El Acta Federal de Licencia Remunerada por Enfermedad ofrece 12 semanas de licencia remunerada a personas a las que les cerraron las escuelas de sus hijos o a las que no tienen cuidado de niño a causa del coronavirus. También ofrece dos semanas de licencia remunerada para cuidar a un miembro de la familia enfermo. Si está cuidando a un familiar enfermo, puede que también tenga derecho a licencia no remunerada pero con la extensión de su seguro de salud a través del Acta Federal de Licencias Familiares y Médicas (FMLA por sus siglas en inglés).

Si a usted le niegan la licencia, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

8. ¿Tengo protecciones si estoy particularmente vulnerable a causa de mi condición de salud, tal como un sistema inmunológico comprometida? ¿Puede mi empleador tratarme de otra manera basado en mi condición de salud?

Puede que los individuos con discapacidades tengan derecho a trabajar desde casa o a recibir otras acomodaciones razonables bajo el Acta de Americanos con Discapacidades (ADA por sus siglas en inglés). Ciertas condiciones de salud, tal como un sistema inmunológico comprometida, podría calificar como una discapacidad bajo el ADA. Las complicaciones relacionadas al COVID-19 (más graves que las síntomas de un resfriado o una gripe) también podrían calificarse por acomodaciones razonables.

Si cree que califica por una acomodación bajo la ADA, debería conversar con su empleador. Si su empleador niega su pedido o si tiene una preocupación relacionada, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

9. Tengo miedo a contagiarme del coronavirus. ¿Puedo trabajar desde mi casa?

Generalmente no tiene derecho a trabajar desde su casa a menos que su empleador lo autorice. Dicho eso, como explicamos más arriba, trabajar desde su casa puede ser una acomodación razonable para algunas discapacidades bajo el ADA.

Si cree que califica por una acomodación bajo la ADA, debería conversar con su empleador. Si su empleador niega su pedido o si tiene una preocupación relacionada, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

10. ¿Qué pasa si me enfermo? ¿Me pueden despedir? ¿Qué pasa si me enfermo en el trabajo?

Su salud y la salud de su comunidad son nuestras prioridades en este momento. Si está enfermo, urgimos que no vaya al trabajo. Hay leyes que protegen a trabajadores del despido por condiciones de salud serias. Si usted se enferma a causa del trabajo, puede que tenga derecho a la compensación al trabajador.

Si se enferma en el trabajo o le despiden porque se enfermó, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

11. ¿Si estoy trabajando desde mi casa, mi empleador me tiene que pagar?

Si. Se requiere que su empleador le pague aun cuando esté trabajando desde su casa. Si no le paga, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

12. ¿Puede mi empleador prohibir que hable de la salud y seguridad en el trabajo con mis gerentes o con mis colegas?

No. Su empleador no puede prohibir que hable de la salud y seguridad en el trabajo. De hecho, el Acta de Relaciones Laborales (NLRA por sus siglas en inglés) protege su derecho y el derecho de sus colegas a trabajar juntos para reclamar mejores condiciones de trabajo de su empleador. También existen protecciones contra represalias por reportar violaciones relacionadas a la salud y seguridad de los trabajadores a la Administración de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional (OSHA por sus siglas en inglés).

Si su empleador le prohíbe a hablar de sus preocupaciones relacionadas a la salud y seguridad en el trabajo o toma represalias cuando reporte violaciones, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

13. ¿Qué deberia hacer si estoy sufriendo discriminación en el trabajo a causa de mi raza, etnicidad , u origen nacional?

Tanto la ley federal como la estatal prohíbe la discriminación por empleadores o colegas basada en su raza, etnicidad, u origen nacional. Si cree que este sufriendo discriminación, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

14. Estoy trabajando desde mi casa, y tuve varios gastos relacionados a la preparación de mi espacio de trabajo. ¿Qué puedo hacer?

Si ha incurrido gastos porque su empleador ha requerido que trabaje desde su casa, puede que tenga reclamos bajo las leyes de horas y salarios. Comuniquese con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

15. ¿Qué hago si mi empleador provee mi casa?

En la mayoría de los casos, el hecho de que su empleador provee su casa no quiere decir que no tenga derecho a la vivienda. Si tiene miedo de perder su casa, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ. Enfocaremos nuestros esfuerzos en los casos relacionados a la salud, seguridad, y la pérdida de vivienda.

16. ¿Qué puedo hacer si creo que mi empleador está violando la ley o tomando ventaja de un programa de asistencia gubernamental?

Varias leyes federales protegen a los trabajadores de las represalias por reportar un fraude que su empleador comete contra el gobierno. Si cree que su empleador está violando la ley o quiere más información con respecto a sus derechos, puede comunicarse con nosotros para un análisis de su caso gratuito y confidencial AQUÍ.

17. ¿Qué pasa si mi negocio permanece abierto pero parece que no es esencial y, por lo tanto, debería cerrarse bajo la orden del Gobernador Polis?

Si su empleador permanece abierto, pero parece que debería cerrar, debe reportar el negocio a su agencia local de salud pública. Una lista de agencias locales de salud pública está disponible aquí. Si no recibe una respuesta inmediata de esa oficina, también debe enviar un informe a la Oficina del Fiscal General de Colorado enviando un correo electrónico a: covid19@coag.gov. También puede completar nuestro formulario legal, disponible aquí, y podemos hacer un informe anónimo para usted, pero le recomendamos que se comunique con los funcionarios públicos directamente.

18. ¿Qué hago si mi empleador me obliga a trabajar en condiciones inseguras que me temo que me harán contraer COVID-19?

Si su empleador lo obliga a trabajar en condiciones inseguras, debe informar el problema al empleador y presentar una queja ante la Administración Federal de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional (OSHA por sus siglas en inglés), un formulario de queja está disponible aquí. Su empleador no puede tomar represalias contra usted por reportar condiciones inseguras a ellos o a una agencia federal o estatal. Sin embargo, es importante saber de qué quejándose del problema no resolverá el problema rápidamente. Si su lugar de trabajo no es seguro, también tiene derecho a dejar de trabajar. Es posible que luego puedas argumentar que tuvo “causa justa” para dejar, y serás elegible para el seguro de desempleo. Posteriormente, también podrías argumentar que estuvo sujeto a una terminación ilegal y que tiene derecho a daños y perjuicios. Pero no podemos hacer ninguna garantía de que tendrá éxito en hacer cualquiera de esos argumentos.